How to Get Your Spouse on Board with Homeschooling


 
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You have heard all the stories regarding homeschooling your child, and so has your spouse. From the lack of socialization to not being as prepared as their peers, homeschooling gets a bad rap. However, homeschooling can be just as good for your child if not better than public school.

Here’s how to get your spouse on board with homeschooling!

Give the Facts

Let’s face it; research statistics speak louder than any words or actions you can give your spouse. So, here’s the stats you will want to share:

  • 3 million kids are homeschooled in the US alone!
  • Taxpayers spend over 11,000 for one student whereas parents spend only $600 a year.
  • Homeschooling is growing more now than ever before.
  • Homeschool students score 15 to 30 points HIGHER on standardized tests.
  • Homeschool students typically score above average on tests like the SAT and ACT.
  • Homeschool students are being recruited by colleges across the country.
  • Homeschool students score above average on achievement tests.
  • Homeschool students are statistically doing above average on measures of emotional, social, and psychological development.
  • They score above average in peer interaction, leadership skills, family cohesion, participation in community service, self-esteem, and self-concept.
  • Homeschool children are involved in many extra-curricular activities such as field trips, 4-H, political drives, ministry programs, and community outreach.

When it comes to the facts, they speak for themselves.

READ MORE: 5 Questions to Ask Yourself Before You Begin Homeschooling

Listen to Your Spouse’s Concerns

Many people just want to be heard. Practice active listening skills with your spouse. It is important to understand where they are coming from and listen to what they are concerned about. Ask your spouse how you can ease those concerns, and come up with solutions to the problems.

Express Your Fears

Even if you are on board for homeschooling, change is a scary thing. Talk to your spouse about your fears, concerns, and what you are going to do to make sure they don’t become a reality. Knowing that you, also, have fears concerning homeschooling puts you both on the same page. Relate to each other and discuss options.

READ MORE: What Do I Do When Friends and Family are Critical of Our Decision to Homeschool?

Decide on “Trying it Out” Instead of Making It Permanent

Talk to your spouse about giving homeschooling a trial and error period. Maybe try homeschooling out for a year. There are many ways you can measure your success at homeschooling. Here are a few ways to show whether or not you should continue:

  • Take a pre-test at the beginning of the year, and a mastery test at the end. Did your child learn more than he knew?
  • Ask yourself did you feel you could continue doing it?
  • Are your kids happy?
  • How did your spouse feel about it?

These are all great ways to get your spouse on board with homeschooling. Sometimes it just takes trying it out to really convince them it is the best option.

What other ways have you found to convince your spouse? Share your tips in the comments below!


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Hi, there! I’m Heather Bowen, and I am so glad you’re here.

My passion lies in helping homeschool moms balance marriage, motherhood, homemaking, and homeschooling all while remaining sane!

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